This is a lighthouse, your call!

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It’s the last day of the last winter month. That doesn’t necessarily mean that winter is over but March is definitely a spring month so let’s look at a pair of mittens before we lose our winter month entirely.

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They turned out pretty good, didn’t they? Blockning was good, and a little distance as well, to change my mind about them. They are big enough to fit a pair of gloves underneath (at one point they actually reminded me of a pair of oven mittens) and they are unique in a way that you can be pretty safe that you’ll be the only one having a pair. They are an early birthday gift to Julle since they were more suited for winter and his birthday is next week (again, March is a spring month) and he likes both boats and lighthouses so that was definitely a hit.

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I like that they are different, left from right. It made it more fun to knit the other one. Also, looking into a better way to twist the yarn to avoid long floats made a huge difference.

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I still need to practise my color work though but it’s quite typical me to take on something very difficult without thinking when it comes to knitting. I remember my first bigger lace work. It was a cute little top and the pattern also happened to be in English, my first English pattern as it happens. I finished that top but it was very difficult. I have absolutely no respect for knitting, I expect to know everything at once and take on pretty much whatever. Luckily it most often work out well so I guess that’s why I still show no respect for difficult parts. These mittens where unnecessarily tricky but it went well in the end.

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I like the little details such as the thumbs having different patterns: gulls on one and waves on the other. A very clever, if still tricky, pattern. Hats off for the designer and happy early birthday to Julle!

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Pattern: Moonlit Coast Mittens by Erica Mount. Yarn: Rauma finullgarn, colors 400 and 449. The biggest question remains though: how many times can a husband’s bare foot be shown in a documentation of mittens?